Ferris wheel

The best part of being on the “Ferris wheel” is that I can see more as I ascend.
He had been diagnosed long ago with “borderline” after an one hour psych assessment. He had spent years studying what that means and learning about himself. He now has a most kind psychiatrist whom he rarely sees now. He was in the very first psychotherapy group I ran. He has since acquired a Master degree and completed an MBSR program. He grows a beautiful vegetable garden, continuous to study and has found peace and contentment.
The other day he came to see me and we travelled back in our memories together. He told me the story of a time when he went to see a family physician for the first time; and the young physician looked him in the eye and told him “I don’t treat alcoholics”. He said “the funny thing is that I didn’t even drink any more by then… I think he assumed I drank because of all the crucifix tattooed on my knuckles”. He then told me that physician was me. For a moment I felt a sense of shame; I quickly reminded myself, the young physician who judged imprecisely due to his inexperience deserves the same compassion as anyone else. I reminded myself not to judge anyone, not another patient, another doctor or anyone. I have learned that people do change; it just takes time and some growing awareness. I have learned that patients foremost suffer an inability to choose the object of their attention. I have learned that pain is the language by which the body speaks to the mind. All they need is some new perspectives and to develop sufficient mindfulness to use them. I love going to work for each patient engagement is now an opportunity for me to help someone else see more clearly how life really is. I am not sure if this is the top; but I am pretty sure I am still ascending. In any case, the view is already fantastic!

No comments:

Post a Comment

What is happiness, complacency and oneness

I am grateful for my life and my life as a family physician. I tell my patients happiness are transient moments and so are sadness. T...